sleeping-with-unicornios:

Tsukuyomi Infinito..

sleeping-with-unicornios:

Tsukuyomi Infinito..

make me choose: rose tyler or clara oswald

bromogeekmusings:

radimus-co-uk:

enochliew:

Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

Not only a portable design, but able to print on any size page.

it finally feels like 2014

Every once in a while there’s an invention you never knew you always needed.

leaveyourkeyinthemailb0x:

see that girl you just called a lesbian? is she? can you help me get her number?

ermahgerdkerfer:

Damn, this girl was prepared.

A message from Anonymous


I have heard quite a few rose tyler fans recently talk about how she would have spent the rest of her life aimless and not reaching her potential without the doctor and that it was his presence that was necessary to make her grow into anything more than a shopgirl. That sounds extremely patriarchal to me, but I wanted to ask you, from a feminist perspective, what's your take on this?

whovianfeminism:

liathepenguinologist:

whovianfeminism:

scifi-fantasist:

whovianfeminism:

whovianfeminism:

Oh my god I have so many feelings about this.

First of all, while I think it’s fair to acknowledge that traveling with the Doctor does give Rose a sense of purpose and direction and helps her reach her full potential, I really don’t like saying that she NEVER would’ve grown to her full potential if she hadn’t met the Doctor. Plenty of people start off in jobs they find unfulfilling and, through their own initiative, find something else to do with their lives that they find more fulfilling. We don’t need to meet a 900 year old alien with a time machine to do that.

But I also find a lot of problems with the assertion that the female companions reaching their full potential through the Doctor is patriarchal in nature.

First, the companions don’t necessarily change becauseof the Doctor; they change because of their experiences traveling through time and space. They discover a lot about themselves by being put in incredible situations that wouldn’t happen to them on Earth. They discover just how strong, courageous, and passionate they can be. And they discover a lot of this in the Doctor’s access.

Now, a valid criticism that can be made of this argument is that they can only access these experiences through the Doctor, who is the only person who can pilot the TARDIS and provide them with these experiences. But I would also point out that the Doctor helps all of his companions reach their full potential, regardless of gender. If only the female companions were transformed by their experiences and the male companions started off amazing and remained essentially unchanged I’d agree that this was patriarchal, because the men would reach their full potential on their own and the women would only be able to do so through a man. But the Doctor helps all of his companions reach their full potential by putting them in situations where they can discover their abilities on their own, and occasionally giving them additional encouragement and support. 

The ultimate lesson of Doctor Who is that everyone is important and that anyone is capable of being extraordinary in the right circumstances. 

mrsolivertwist said: It’s also important to note that the Doctor’s companions—male and female help HIM reach his full potential. Their strengths (and weaknesses) push him to be more compassionate, loving, open, confident, and humble.

That’s also a very important point. The relationship isn’t one sided; it’s not just the man coming in and making the women better. It’s a mutually beneficial relationship where they challenge each other and make each other better.

I mostly agree w/ this except Moffat. With Rose, Martha, and Donna we saw the Doctor grow in fundamental ways b/c of their influence. Moffs-era tho… idk. Amy Pond fer sher helped heal his broken heart but how did he actually grow? Moffs!Doctor feels hella patriarchal to me.

Moffs!Doctor feels hella patriarchal to me.”

The Californian in me NEEDS that on a T-Shirt.

But yes, you’re absolutely right. During the Moffat era, their journeys in the TARDIS are presented more as fun journeys or holidays, and their character development isn’t near the scale of earlier companions’ character development. In addition, none of Moffat’s companions ever seriously challenge the Doctor’s most troubling and problematic behaviors.

(I thought about discussing that earlier, but I’ve been working on a massive academic paper criticizing Doctor Who all week and decided for my fun Saturday night blogging I was gonna focus on all of the things that made me happy.)

*Gasp*

A massive academic paper I actually want to read? What sorcery is this?

It will hopefully be up on the website within the next few months! More information will be coming soon!

soltian:

sometimes i like to draw my cats as food and i am not sorry.

biscuit cats.

…biscats.

x

driveshesaid:

Yesterdays spring inspired outfit

driveshesaid:

Yesterdays spring inspired outfit

lostlungss:

can I pls

lostlungss:

can I pls